Lateral Ligament Reconstruction With Tendon Graft

Indication

Ankle instability can be treated surgically with a lateral ligament repair (Brostrom procedure) or a lateral ligament reconstruction using a tendon graft (See Figure #1).  It is often the preference of the surgeon that determines which of these surgeries is performed.  A previous failure of an ankle ligament stabilization procedure may be an indication for a reconstruction using a tendon graft.

Procedure

Tendon reconstruction of the outside ankle ligaments involves stabilizing the stretched out dysfunctional ankle ligaments (anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments) by weaving a tendon graft through bones on the outside of the ankle (See Figure 1). This is performed by using either: a nearby tendon; a tendon that has been harvested near the knee joint (gracilis or semitendinosis); or by using a tendon from a cadaver. The tendon graft is usually placed through the end of the fibula, the talar neck, and often the calcaneus (See Figure 1). There are a variety of ways to perform the reconstruction. In each case the tendon is pulled tight, and secured solidly to the bone so that the ankle joint will be stable when it is subject to an inversion force (See Figure 2).

Recovery

Recovery from a tendon reconstruction as treatment for ankle instability requires a period of immobilization usually on the order of 6 weeks. This allows the tendon-bone interface to consolidate. After approximately 6 weeks the rehabilitation phase is started. The rehabilitation phase focuses on:

  1. Improving ankle motion
  2. Strengthening the muscles around the ankle
  3. Regaining ankle proprioception
  4. Improving gait

Some ankle bracing (ex. Ankle lacer) is often indicated for 6-12 months following surgery.

Potential Complications of the Surgery

There are some potential risks of surgery that are specific to lateral ligament reconstruction procedures. This includes:

  • Injury to the superficial peroneal nerve: This nerve often runs through the wound. The nerve is usually identified and is not normally cut. However, in the repair and healing process, this nerve can become scarred, leading to either decreased sensation over the top of the foot or in some cases, a painful burning sensation in this region. If this type of neuritis occurs, fairly aggressive therapy to desensitize this area is required.
  • Stretching out of the tendon reconstruction: Failure of the tendon reconstruction either by stretching out or by pulling the tendon out of the bone can occur. The tendon graft will stretch out when the tendon tissue is not strong enough to withstand the forces applied to it. The strength of the tendon graft is usually very strong when it is inially placed at the time of surgery. However, biologically the tendon graft actually weakens significantly in the months after surgery. This is because the tendon graft is usually without a blood supply when it is surgically positioned. The blood supply slowly gets re-established and when this happens some of the tendon substance is reabsorbed causing it to weaken. However, the tendon graft is usually quite strong to begin with so failure of the graft has not been a major problem.

Patients undergoing the surgery are subject to the potential for the usual risks associated with surgery such as the risk of:

This procedure is designed to effectively treat ankle instability. The pain that originates from other sources such as the ankle joint itself will not necessarily be addressed with this procedure.

July 4th, 2014